Immunisation Alliance

What immunisation protects against

Please have a look at these real story and information videos

  1. Whooping cough- pertussis
  2. Measles
  3. Rubella
  4. Mumps
  5. Varicella- Chicken Pox
  6. Pneumococcal disease
  7. Meningococcal
  8. Current Vaccine schedule in WA & Travellers

1. Whooping cough- pertussis

Pertussis, commonly called whooping cough is a highly contagious, acute, respiratory( breathing) bacterial infection. Whooping cough may be hard to diagnose,as the 'whoop' following the coughing bouts is not always present. It is a notifiable disease- this means you should see your healthcare provider even if you suspect that you or your child has whooping cough.

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2. Measles

Measles is an infectious disease some might remember from childhood. It is a notifiable disease, meaning you should see your healthcare provider should you suspect a case of measles. It can be diagnosed by a blood test.

Measles is a highly infectious disease, although uncommon, it is an acute viral infection.

The symptoms vary and can include lethargy, malaise, cough, sore and swollen eyes and nasal passages, fever and rash.

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3. Rubella

Penny from Armadale, WA has told us her story about her mother's rubella infection and how it affected her whole life. Click on the teaser below to read more! 

Legally I am blind. I have been all my life. I have never known any other way and I manage my situation well.  In fact I take it as a compliment that sometimes, people don't realise at first that I can't see like they do.

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4. Mumps


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5. Varicella- Chicken Pox


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6. Pneumococcal disease

This is a common , acute, bacterial infection, that can cause septicaemia( blood poisoning) , pneumonia, meningitis or ear infections. Symptoms vary depending on the strain.

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7. Meningococcal

Meningococcal disease is rare, but it can be deadly, leading to death in 10-15 percent of cases.
Among those who survive, as many as 20 percent live with permanent disabilities, such as brain damage, hearing loss, loss of kidney function or limb amputations.
Adolescents and young adults are among those at greatest risk for meningococcal disease.
Prevention of meningococcal disease is critical because it can be mistaken for flu or other viral infections and it can rapidly lead to death or disability.

Here in Western Australia we have the Amanda Young Foundation. The AYF hosts numerous education and fundraising events during the year, and also presents an annual conference about Meningococcal Disease, this year at the Crowne. 

We also have the Stepphen Sanig foundation, which states 'The Stephen Sanig Research Institute has been established to develop and disseminate new and effective methods for the prevention, treatment and management of meningococcal disease, with the goal of reducing the incidence and effects of the disease in Australia.'

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8. Current Vaccine schedule in WA & Travellers

For information on all the vaccines available in WA , the Department of Health  has a current list available for download, giving up to date information on the current recommended vaccination schedule.

If you are travelling, we recommend you check the current recommendations for safe travelling on the WA Health Department's Risks to Your Health when Overseas page, and talk to a travel doctor as appropriate.

 

 

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What side effects can I expect after a vaccine ?

What to do and who to contact if you are worried about yourself or someone else following a vaccination.

 

What is Immunisation ?

Videos showing the science behind immunisation. Find out the facts, weigh and balance, the risk of the disease and the risk of the vaccine.

 

WA Vaccination Schedule 2014

WA Health has released the list of government provided vaccines for 2014. If you want to know when, what and where for your child then check it out!

 

Immunisation Alliance News